Category Archives: Science / Technology

Big Tongues And Extra Vertebrae: The Unintended Consequences Of Animal Gene Editing.

Genetic Engineering And Gene Manipulation Concept

By Preetika Rana and Lucy Craymer
Wall St Journal, updates Dec 14, 2018

* Unintended consequences have included enlarged rabbit tongues and extra pig vertebrae, as bioethicists warn of hubris

The purported birth last month of the world’s first gene-edited human babies, claimed by a Chinese scientist, spurred a wave of global outrage. Scientists denounced the (as yet unconfirmed) experiment as irresponsible, and the development reinforced fears that the redesigning of DNA is moving ahead too fast and without necessary oversight.

The proliferation of similar experiments on farm animals in recent years supports those concerns. Though rapid strides have been made to map genomes—the full set of genes for humans, animals, insects and plants—scientists have only begun to understand what the tens of thousands of individual genes do. Moreover, they are far from unraveling how those genes interact with each other.

Scientists around the world are editing the genes of livestock to create meatier pigs, cashmere goats with longer hair and cold-weather cows that can thrive in the tropics. The goals are to improve agricultural productivity, produce hardier beasts and reduce practices that are costly or considered inhumane. But amid some successes, disturbing outcomes are surfacing.

When Chinese researchers deleted a gene that limits muscle growth in mammals so that rabbits would grow leaner, their creations exhibited an unusual characteristic: enlarged tongues. Similar experiments on Chinese pigs led some to develop an additional vertebrae. Gene-edited calves died prematurely in Brazil and New Zealand.

The stumbles show the risks of racing ahead with such experiments, even as many governments work to clear regulatory pathways to bring meat, eggs and dairy from gene-edited animals to store shelves. Bioethicists and many geneticists have raised doubts about applying the gene-editing technology to animals and especially humans, given the continued uncertainties in both the science and the lab and field results.

“Humans have a very long history of messing around in nature with all kinds of unintended consequences,” said Lisa Moses, an animal bioethicist at Harvard Medical School’s Center for Bioethics. “It’s really hubris of us to assume that we know what we’re doing and that we can predict what kinds of bad things can happen.”

The belief has spread that scientists know how gene editing works “all the time, under all conditions,” says Odd-Gunnar Wikmark, a researcher at the Norway-based foundation GenOk, which studies the consequences of genetic engineering. “We of course do not.”

Critics say that editing animal DNA could introduce unwanted mutations that pose a threat to human health when consumed, and they fear that mutated genes may spread unchecked as animals breed. Proponents say they are engineering mutations just as traditional crossbreeding does, only faster. Though no gene-edited animal products have reached markets yet, the potential benefits to farming have led many big agricultural nations to join the race.

Crispr-Cas9, the tool introduced in 2012 that was used to engineer the human babies, is cheaper than older techniques and enables scientists to add, delete and rearrange DNA with greater precision. But an article published in the journal Nature Biotechnology in July suggests that Crispr might cause greater damage than previously understood—including changes in genes other than those intended. When DNA is cut, “a lot of odd things can happen,” study leader Allan Bradleysaid in July.

Take the gene called MSTN. Since 2012, Kui Li, a scientist with the state-run Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, has reverse-engineered cells from adult Chinese pigs to their embryonic stage, which is a common process when cloning animals. Then, using an older editing tool, he deleted MSTN, which limits how large muscles grow in mammals, including in humans. The edited cells are infused into eggs, chemically fertilized in a lab and implanted into the womb of a surrogate. At a farm 70 miles southeast of Beijing, dozens of pigs rest in metallic cages and glass enclosures; their meat is up to 12% leaner if both copies of their MSTN gene are deleted.

But there was another effect on the pigs: One in five offspring who inherited the edited genes had an extra spinal bone known as thoracic vertebrae, Dr. Li found. He doesn’t know why, though he postulates that the MSTN gene somehow contributes to skeletal formation. Lab tests show that his pigs are safe to eat, said Dr. Li: Despite a slight fading in color after cooking, he recorded no nutritional differences. He’s begun using Crispr to make more commercial breeds like the U.K.’s Large White leaner or resistant to PRRS, a deadly viral infection.

When state-sponsored scientists at Nanjing Agricultural University used Crispr to edit MSTN out of rabbits to make them meatier, 14 of the 34 engineered offspring were inexplicably born with enlarged tongues, leading the scientists to warn of abnormalities from gene editing in a 2016 research paper on their project. “Safety issues need to be addressed in future studies before the technology can be utilized” in agriculture, the authors wrote.

“Even the genes that we think we know very well, there’s a lot to learn,” said Se-Jin Lee, one of the scientists who discovered MSTN at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1997.

Chinese scientists at a different research facility have had to use caesarean sections to birth lambs whose MSTN genes were deleted with Crispr, because some grew too large to be birthed naturally. They have had success modifying goats’ cashmere to grow about 20% longer by preventing the gene FGF5 from regulating the growth.

Generally, the larger the animals, the greater the complications. New Zealand’s AgResearch Ltd. applied Crispr on cattle to reduce their heat stress, deleting a single amino acid on a gene that contributes to coat color (including hair and skin color in humans), in an effort to lighten the cows’ black-and-white coats to better reflect sunlight. Both calves died (one was sick and was euthanized). In a separate experiment using an older tool to enable cold-weather Angus cattle to thrive in the Brazilian tropics, one of two calves died prematurely.

Scientists in both experiments blame cloning, which created the calves but still isn’t foolproof, they say, after two decades in use. Neither is their understanding of genes. “But if we don’t try, we will never learn,” said Goetz Laible, who led AgResearch’s experiment.

Globally, at least a dozen gene-edited livestock projects are aiming to reach consumer markets. Some may face less resistance from consumers and ethicists because they could eliminate reviled practices: Cattle could be engineered without horns, for instance, obviating the need to dehorn them.

Wool from a gene-edited animal might also be more readily accepted because it is only worn, not eaten. Researchers in China’s eastern Xinjiang region used Crispr to alter the ASIP gene, believed to influence coat color in Merino sheep, with the aim of creating new breeds with darker coats—all black, gray or brown — so that off-white wool wouldn’t need to be dyed.

The results confirmed previous research suggesting that genes involved in coat color also play a role in reproduction: Only a fourth as many ewes implanted with the disrupted genes carried to term, as compared to normal circumstances. Meanwhile, for the wool itself, the results were mixed: One sheep was white, two were mostly black, and the other three had spotted fleeces akin to a panda.

The outcome also underlined how far there is to go in understanding the forces at work among the genes of humans and animals. “I think it would be an understatement to say we should be more cautious,” said Lori Marino, a neuroscientist and the founder of Utah-based Kimmela Center for Animal Advocacy. “I think we’ve already gone over the line with animals, and now humans.”

—Zhou Wei contributed to this article

Scientist: China’s Second Gene-Edited Fetus Is 12-14 Weeks Old.

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Date created : 22/01/2019 – 09:47

Beijing (AFP)

The second woman carrying a gene-edited foetus in China is now 12 to 14 weeks into her pregnancy, according to a US physician in close contact with the researcher who claimed to have created the world’s first genetically-modified babies last year.

Chinese scientist He Jiankui shocked the scientific community after revealing that he had successfully altered the DNA of twin girls born in November to prevent them from contracting HIV.

State media reported on Monday that a preliminary investigation confirmed that a second woman became pregnant and that she will be put under medical observation, but no other details about her are known.

Professor He, who now faces a police investigation, had mentioned the potential second pregnancy at a human genome conference in Hong Kong in late November, but its status was unclear until now.

William Hurlbut, a physician and bioethicist at Stanford university in California who has known He for two years, told AFP it was “too early” at the time for the foetus to appear on an ultrasound.

Based on extensive conversations with He, Hurlbut said: “I get the impression the baby was fairly young when the conference happened. It could only be detected chemically, not clinically (at the time).

“So it could be no more than four to six weeks old (at the time), so now it could be about 12 to 14 weeks.”

Hurlbut said he had planned to visit He’s lab following the genome summit. They had seen each other several times over the past two years.

But after news of his experiment was published, He was placed “under protection of security people” and the two never saw each other in person, he said.

They exchanged emails and spoke on the phone every week after that, but Hurlbut last heard from He seven days ago.

He has been residing in an apartment at the Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech) in the city of Shenzhen, where his family has been allowed to visit him in the day time, Hurlbut said.

“He doesn’t sound like a person under terrible fear or stress.” said Hurlbut.

“He said he was free to go out on to the campus and walk around.”

But He could be facing legal trouble.

A probe by the Guangdong provincial government found that He had “forged ethical review papers” and “deliberately evaded supervision”, according to state-run Xinhua news agency.

He had “privately” organised a project team that included foreign staff, it said.

He will be “dealt with seriously according to the law,” and his case will be “handed over to public security organs for handling”, Xinhua said.

© 2019 AFP

NASA’s Voyager 2 Probe Launched In 1977 Enters Interstellar Space.

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This illustration shows the position of NASA’s Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 probes, outside of the heliosphere, a protective bubble created by the Sun that extends well past the orbit of Pluto. Voyager 1 exited the heliosphere in August 2012. Voyager 2 exited at a different location in November 2018. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

nasa.gov

DECEMBER 10, 2018

For the second time in history, a human-made object has reached the space between the stars. NASA’s Voyager 2 probe now has exited the heliosphere – the protective bubble of particles and magnetic fields created by the Sun.

Members of NASA’s Voyager team will discuss the findings at a news conference at 11 a.m. EST (8 a.m. PST) today at the meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in Washington. The news conference will stream live on the agency’s website.

Comparing data from different instruments aboard the trailblazing spacecraft, mission scientists determined the probe crossed the outer edge of the heliosphere on Nov. 5. This boundary, called the heliopause, is where the tenuous, hot solar wind meets the cold, dense interstellar medium. Its twin, Voyager 1, crossed this boundary in 2012, but Voyager 2 carries a working instrument that will provide first-of-its-kind observations of the nature of this gateway into interstellar space.

Voyager 2 now is slightly more than 11 billion miles (18 billion kilometers) from Earth. Mission operators still can communicate with Voyager 2 as it enters this new phase of its journey, but information – moving at the speed of light – takes about 16.5 hours to travel from the spacecraft to Earth. By comparison, light traveling from the Sun takes about eight minutes to reach Earth.

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Artist’s concept of Voyager 2 with 9 facts listed around it. Image Credit: NASA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The most compelling evidence of Voyager 2’s exit from the heliosphere came from its onboard Plasma Science Experiment (PLS), an instrument that stopped working on Voyager 1 in 1980, long before that probe crossed the heliopause. Until recently, the space surrounding Voyager 2 was filled predominantly with plasma flowing out from our Sun. This outflow, called the solar wind, creates a bubble – the heliosphere – that envelopes the planets in our solar system. The PLS uses the electrical current of the plasma to detect the speed, density, temperature, pressure and flux of the solar wind. The PLS aboard Voyager 2 observed a steep decline in the speed of the solar wind particles on Nov. 5. Since that date, the plasma instrument has observed no solar wind flow in the environment around Voyager 2, which makes mission scientists confident the probe has left the heliosphere.

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At the end of 2018, the cosmic ray subsystem aboard NASA’s Voyager 2 spacecraft provided evidence that Voyager 2 had left the heliosphere. There were steep drops in the rate of heliospheric particles that hit the instrument’s radiation detector, and significant increases in the rate of cosmic rays. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC
Larger view

“Working on Voyager makes me feel like an explorer, because everything we’re seeing is new,” said John Richardson, principal investigator for the PLS instrument and a principal research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. “Even though Voyager 1 crossed the heliopause in 2012, it did so at a different place and a different time, and without the PLS data. So we’re still seeing things that no one has seen before.”

In addition to the plasma data, Voyager’s science team members have seen evidence from three other onboard instruments – the cosmic ray subsystem, the low energy charged particle instrument and the magnetometer – that is consistent with the conclusion that Voyager 2 has crossed the heliopause. Voyager’s team members are eager to continue to study the data from these other onboard instruments to get a clearer picture of the environment through which Voyager 2 is traveling.

“There is still a lot to learn about the region of interstellar space immediately beyond the heliopause,” said Ed Stone, Voyager project scientist based at Caltech in Pasadena, California.

Together, the two Voyagers provide a detailed glimpse of how our heliosphere interacts with the constant interstellar wind flowing from beyond. Their observations complement data from NASA’s Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX), a mission that is remotely sensing that boundary. NASA also is preparing an additional mission – the upcoming Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe (IMAP), due to launch in 2024 – to capitalize on the Voyagers’ observations.

“Voyager has a very special place for us in our heliophysics fleet,” said Nicola Fox, director of the Heliophysics Division at NASA Headquarters. “Our studies start at the Sun and extend out to everything the solar wind touches. To have the Voyagers sending back information about the edge of the Sun’s influence gives us an unprecedented glimpse of truly uncharted territory.”

While the probes have left the heliosphere, Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 have not yet left the solar system, and won’t be leaving anytime soon. The boundary of the solar system is considered to be beyond the outer edge of the Oort Cloud, a collection of small objects that are still under the influence of the Sun’s gravity. The width of the Oort Cloud is not known precisely, but it is estimated to begin at about 1,000 astronomical units (AU) from the Sun and to extend to about 100,000 AU. One AU is the distance from the Sun to Earth. It will take about 300 years for Voyager 2 to reach the inner edge of the Oort Cloud and possibly 30,000 years to fly beyond it.

The Voyager probes are powered using heat from the decay of radioactive material, contained in a device called a radioisotope thermal generator (RTG). The power output of the RTGs diminishes by about four watts per year, which means that various parts of the Voyagers, including the cameras on both spacecraft, have been turned off over time to manage power.

“I think we’re all happy and relieved that the Voyager probes have both operated long enough to make it past this milestone,” said Suzanne Dodd, Voyager project manager at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. “This is what we’ve all been waiting for. Now we’re looking forward to what we’ll be able to learn from having both probes outside the heliopause.”

Voyager 2 launched in 1977, 16 days before Voyager 1, and both have traveled well beyond their original destinations. The spacecraft were built to last five years and conduct close-up studies of Jupiter and Saturn. However, as the mission continued, additional flybys of the two outermost giant planets, Uranus and Neptune, proved possible. As the spacecraft flew across the solar system, remote-control reprogramming was used to endow the Voyagers with greater capabilities than they possessed when they left Earth. Their two-planet mission became a four-planet mission. Their five-year lifespans have stretched to 41 years, making Voyager 2 NASA’s longest running mission.

The Voyager story has impacted not only generations of current and future scientists and engineers, but also Earth’s culture, including film, art and music. Each spacecraft carries a Golden Record of Earth sounds, pictures and messages. Since the spacecraft could last billions of years, these circular time capsules could one day be the only traces of human civilization.

Voyager’s mission controllers communicate with the probes using NASA’s Deep Space Network (DSN), a global system for communicating with interplanetary spacecraft. The DSN consists of three clusters of antennas inGoldstone, California; Madrid, Spain; and Canberra, Australia.

The Voyager Interstellar Mission is a part of NASA’s Heliophysics System Observatory, sponsored by the Heliophysics Division of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. JPL built and operates the twin Voyager spacecraft. NASA’s DSN, managed by JPL, is an international network of antennas that supports interplanetary spacecraft missions and radio and radar astronomy observations for the exploration of the solar system and the universe. The network also supports selected Earth-orbiting missions. The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia’s national science agency, operates both the Canberra Deep Space Communication Complex, part of the DSN, and the Parkes Observatory, which NASA has been using to downlink data from Voyager 2 since Nov. 8.

Wisconsin Company Three Square Market Becomes First In The United States To Microchip Their Employees.

Three Square Market And CNBC sell microchips to American Public on August 22, 2018.

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nowtheendbegins.com

by July 23, 2017


Three Square Market (32M) is offering implanted chip technology to all of their employees on August 1st, 2017. Employees will be implanted with a RFID chip allowing them to make purchases in their break room micro market, open doors, login to computers, use the copy machine, etc.  This program, offered by 32M, is optional for all employees. The company is expecting over 50 staff members to be voluntarily chipped.  32M is partnering with BioHax International from Sweden.


WISCONSIN COMPANY THREE SQUARE MARKET IS ABOUT TO BECOME THE FIRST IN THE U.S. TO OFFER MICROCHIP IMPLANTS TO ITS EMPLOYEES. YES, YOU READ THAT RIGHT. MICROCHIP IMPLANTS.

“And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads: And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.” Revelation 13:16,17 (KJV)

EDITOR’S NOTE: Now The End Begins began 8 years ago in December of 2009 primarily as an end times ministry warning the world of God’s impending judgment and the soon fulfillment of Bible prophecy. We have done countless stories chronicling the rise of the human implantable microchip in our society. What began as a mere trickle in Europe is ready to break through here in America as the implantable microchip becomes the “next big thing”. Remember those lines of people waiting for days on end to be the first to get the new iPhone? That’s what you will soon see with the microchip. Flight #777 on Titus 213 Airlines now boarding…

“It’s the next thing that’s inevitably going to happen, and we want to be a part of it,” Three Square MarketChief Executive Officer Todd Westby said.

The company designs software for break room markets that are commonly found in office complexes.

OFFICIAL PRESS RELEASE FROM 32M:

RIVER FALLS, WIS. – JULY 20, 2017 – PRLOG — THREE SQUARE MARKET (32M) IS OFFERING IMPLANTED CHIP TECHNOLOGY TO ALL OF THEIR EMPLOYEES ON AUGUST 1ST, 2017. EMPLOYEES WILL BE IMPLANTED WITH A RFID CHIP ALLOWING THEM TO MAKE PURCHASES IN THEIR BREAK ROOM MICRO MARKET, OPEN DOORS, LOGIN TO COMPUTERS, USE THE COPY MACHINE, ETC. THIS PROGRAM, OFFERED BY 32M, IS OPTIONAL FOR ALL EMPLOYEES. THE COMPANY IS EXPECTING OVER 50 STAFF MEMBERS TO BE VOLUNTARILY CHIPPED. 32M IS PARTNERING WITH BIOHAX INTERNATIONAL AND JOWAN OSTERLAND, CEO, BASED OUT OF SWEDEN. SOURCE

JUST AS PEOPLE ARE ABLE TO PURCHASE ITEMS AT THE MARKET USING PHONES, WESTBY WANTS TO DO THE SAME THING USING A MICROCHIP IMPLANTED INSIDE A PERSON’S HAND.

“We’ll come up, scan the item,” he explained, while showing how the process will work at an actual break room market kiosk. “We’ll hit pay with a credit card, and it’s asking to swipe my proximity payment now. I’ll hold my hand up, just like my cell phone, and it’ll pay for my product.”

MORE THAN 50 THREE SQUARE MARKET EMPLOYEES ARE HAVING THE DEVICES IMPLANTED STARTING NEXT WEEK. EACH CHIP IS ABOUT THE SIZE OF A SINGLE GRAIN OF RICE.

ALONG WITH PURCHASING MARKET KIOSK ITEMS, EMPLOYEES WILL BE ABLE TO USE THE CHIP TO GET INTO THE FRONT DOOR AND LOG ONTO THEIR COMPUTERS.

 

Each chip costs $300 and the company is picking up the tab. They’re implanted between a person’s thumb and forefinger.  Westby added the data is both encrypted and secure.

 

“There’s no GPS tracking at all,” he said.

 

No one who works at Three Square Market is required to get the chip implant. source

United Kingdom Companies Implanting Employees With Microchips.

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Jowan Österlund from Biohax holds a microchip implant the size of a grain of rice between his thumb and forefinger. Photograph: James Brooks/AP

Alarm over talks to implant UK employees with microchips.

theguardian.com

Trades Union Congress concerned over tech being used to control and micromanage.

Britain’s biggest employer organisation and main trade union body have sounded the alarm over the prospect of British companies implanting staff with microchips to improve security.

UK firm BioTeq, which offers the implants to businesses and individuals, has already fitted 150 implants in the UK.

The tiny chips, implanted in the flesh between the thumb and forefinger, are similar to those for pets. They enable people to open their front door, access their office or start their car with a wave of their hand, and can also store medical data.

Another company, Biohax of Sweden, also provides human chip implants the size of a grain of rice. It told the Sunday Telegraph (£) that it is in discussions with several British legal and financial firms about fitting their employees with microchips, including one major company with hundreds of thousands of employees.

The CBI, which represents 190,000 UK businesses, voiced concerns about the prospect.

A CBI spokesperson said: “While technology is changing the way we work, this makes for distinctly uncomfortable reading. Firms should be concentrating on rather more immediate priorities and focusing on engaging their employees.”

The TUC is worried that staff could be coerced into being microchipped. Its general secretary Frances O’Grady said: “We know workers are already concerned that some employers are using tech to control and micromanage, whittling away their staff’s right to privacy.

“Microchipping would give bosses even more power and control over their workers. There are obvious risks involved, and employers must not brush them aside, or pressure staff into being chipped.”

Steven Northam, the founder and owner of Hampshire-based BioTeq, told the Guardian that most of its 150 implants have been for individuals, while some financial and engineering firms have also had the chips implanted in their staff.

BioTeq has also implanted them in employees of a bank testing the technology, and has shipped them to Spain, France, Germany, Japan and China.

They cost between £70 and £260 per person. Northam himself and all the directors at BioTeq and one of his other companies, IncuHive, have been microchipped.

Jowan Österlund, the founder of Biohax and a former body piercer, told the Telegraph that his microchips, which cost £150 each, could help financial and legal firms improve security. “These companies have sensitive documents they are dealing with. [The chips] would allow them to set restrictions for whoever.”

Österlund said big companies, with 200,000 employees, could offer this as an opt-in. “If you have a 15% uptake that is still a huge number of people that won’t require a physical ID pass.”

Last year Wisconsin-based Three Square Market partnered with Biohax and became the first company in the US to microchip its employees, on a voluntary basis.

KPMG, one of the big four accountancy firms, said it was not planning to microchip its employees and “would under no circumstances consider doing so”.

Fellow accounting firms EY and PwC also said they would not consider microchipping their employees. Deloitte declined to comment.

Biohax has plans to open an office in London, according to its website. It claims 4,000 people have been microchipped, mostly in Sweden. It is working with the state-owned Swedish rail firm Statens Järnvägar, to allow its passengers to travel via chip implants rather than train tickets. Biohax did not respond to requests for comment.

A.I. Robots To Be Smart As Humans In Less Than Fifty Years.

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Robots will soon match humans in creativity, emotional intelligence.

nypost.com
By Andy Meek, BGR

As if we didn’t already have enough to worry about when it comes to artificially intelligent machines being able to perform many tasks faster and better than humans can, potentially stealing our jobs in the future and presenting what some technologists worry is an existential threat to humanity, now it appears AI will soon be able to match humans at being, well, human, too.

An Australian AI expert, Toby Walsh, said during the Festival of Dangerous Ideas in Sydney recently that he thinks AI will learn and possibly match human traits like creativity, emotional intelligence and adaptability in less than 50 years. And Walsh — a Scientia Professor of Artificial Intelligence at UNSW Sydney — predicts robots will be as smart as humans by the year 2062.

But don’t worry about them ultimately presenting some sort of threat or something as drastic as potentially wiping out mankind, he adds. “We’ve been rather mislead by this idea that the robots are going to take over,” Walsh told Time Out. “The robots have no desires of their own, they do exactly what we tell them to. I’m much more worried about incompetence than malevolence – that we’ll get the machines to do something and we haven’t thought carefully about how it’s going to interact with our complex world … Healthcare, transport, how we manufacture things, how we educate ourselves, how we go out and play — it’s going to touch almost every aspect of our lives.”

It’s interesting to think about this other side of increasingly smarter machines and to ask questions about the fundamental nature of consciousness and emotion. These right-brain characteristics of being human, things like creativity and emotion and the like — we like to think they will save us or somehow set us apart from machines that are radically smarter, faster and better at us in other things. But if they eventually get to be as creative as us to complement their already stellar analytical capabilities, what then?

When Walsh says he’s worried, though, it’s not about what the machines will do. It’s us he’s worried about. Mankind, he says, needs to do a better job of creating machines and AI systems that are aligned with our values now.

“The only hope we have to deal with all these wicked problems like climate change, increasing inequality and the ongoing refugee problem, is if we embrace technology and use the world’s resources in a better, more sustainable way,” he told Time Out. “The future is a product of the decisions we make today. Society shapes technology and technology can shape society.”

Netflix Using Form Of Facial Recognition To Change Program With A Stare.

NETFLIX has invented a way to change programme with just a stare.

The system, created by engineers in the company’s Californian HQ, would help those with disabilities — as well as those simply feeling too tired to move.New technology means soon you won’t even have to move if you want to change what you are watching on Netflix.

It lets iPhone users’ eye movements control a pointer on the screen to select things by staring at them. Sticking out your tongue takes it back a step.

The tech, made by software team Eye Nav, could open Netflix to a new audience.

A spokesman for Eye Nav said: “The same technology that enables Face ID is great for accurately tracking eye position and facial expression.

“We care a lot about accessibility.”

eBay is among other popular apps testing out new technology for those who may be unable to handle their device.

Other popular apps are already trialling new systems for people unable to touch their phones or tablets.

eBay has announced Head Gaze after intern Muratcan Cicek, an intern with motor impairment, created the control.

He said: “It allows you to scroll and interact on your phone with only subtle head movements.

“Think of all the ways that this could be brought to life.

 

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