Category Archives: Big Brother

New FBI Document Shows Conspiracy Theorist’s Listed As A New Domestic Terrorism Threat.

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FBI: Conspiracy Theories Are Domestic Terror Threat.

By Cathy Burke | Thursday, 01 August 2019 04:59 PM

Source: newsmax.com

The FBI now considers crackpot fringe conspiracy theories — like the deep-state believer QAnon and the pedophile paranoid Pizzagate — a domestic terrorist threat, Yahoo News reported.

“The FBI assesses these conspiracy theories very likely will emerge, spread, and evolve in the modern information marketplace, occasionally driving both groups and individual extremists to carry out criminal or violent acts,” states an FBI intelligence bulletin from the bureau’s Phoenix field office dated May 30, the news outlet reported Thursday.

The document specifically mentions QAnon, a shadowy network that believes in a deep state conspiracy against President Donald Trump, and Pizzagate, the theory a pedophile ring including Clinton associates was being run out of the basement of a Washington, D.C., pizza restaurant.

“The FBI assesses these conspiracy theories very likely will emerge, spread, and evolve in the modern information marketplace, occasionally driving both groups and individual extremists to carry out criminal or violent acts,” the document states.

It also goes on to say the FBI believes conspiracy theory-driven extremists are likely to increase during the 2020 presidential election cycle.

“The advent of the Internet and social media has enabled promoters of conspiracy theories to produce and share greater volumes of material via online platforms that larger audiences of consumers can quickly and easily access,” the document says, the news outlet reported.

The FBI is already under fire for its approach to domestic extremism, Yahoo News noted — pointing to a hearing last week before the Senate Judiciary Committee in which FBI Director Christopher Wray faced accusations the bureau was not focusing enough on white supremacist violence.

Wray told the lawmakers the FBI had dispensed with separate categories for black identity extremists and white supremacists, saying the bureau was focusing on “racially motivated” violence, the New York Post noted.

Yahoo News reported the bulletin focused on violence based specifically on beliefs that “attempt to explain events or circumstances as the result of a group of actors working in secret to benefit themselves at the expense of others” and are “usually at odds with official or prevailing explanations of events.”

Besides QAnon and Pizzagate, the FBI document also cites a California man who was arrested Dec. 19, 2018, after being found with what appeared to be bomb-making materials in his vehicle.

The unnamed man was planning to “blow up a satanic temple monument” in the Capitol rotunda in Springfield, Illinois, to “make Americans aware of Pizzagate and the New World Order, who were dismantling society,” according to the document.

Volvo To Electronically Restrict Speed Across Its Fleet And Monitor Drivers.

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Volvo To Electronically Restrict Speed Across Its Fleet.

drivespark.com

By Rahul Jaswal
Updated: Thursday, March 7, 2019, 14:11 [IST

Volvo aims to achieve “no fatalities” as part of its Vision 2020. The Swedish automaker will restrict top speed on all its civilian cars starting next year. As part of its enhanced safety drive, Volvo will electronically limit the top speed to 180kmph on all its vehicles. They aim for no one to be killed or seriously injured in Volvo cars.
Hakan Samuelsson, President and Chief Executive, Volvo Cars, stated, “Volvo is a leader in safety: we always have been and we always will be. Because of our research we know where the problem areas are when it comes to ending serious injuries and fatalities in our cars. And while a speed limitation is not a cure-all, it’s worth doing if we can even save one life. We want to start a conversation about whether car makers have the right or maybe even an obligation to install technology in cars that change their driver’s behaviour, to tackle things like speeding, intoxication or distraction. We don’t have a firm answer to this question, but believe we should take leadership in the discussion and be a pioneer.”
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Volvo says the speed limit is necessary because existing active and passive safety features in most cars are unable to prevent fatalities and severe injuries above a certain seed limit. This is also reason why countries set speed limits and restrictions. However, speeding is common practice and the leading cause of road fatalities.

Volvo cars also plans to address two more problems that result in accidents. One is drivers under thee influence of alcohol and or drugs, and the other is distracted drivers. They plan to present some ideas at a safety event at Sweden on March 20, 2019.
Volvo’s cars will include new technology that will monitor the vehicle and also driver behaviour. They’re working on a separate system that will use smart speed control and geofencing technologies to automatically restrict speeds around schools and hospitals.

Volvo also said that none of their police cars will have the 180kmph speed restrictions.

Thoughts About Electronic Speed Restrictions On Volvo Cars.

We think this is a fantastic idea. However, for India, 180kmph is still over the top. Again, watching these technologies work in real time will be interesting.

Wisconsin Company Three Square Market Becomes First In The United States To Microchip Their Employees.

Three Square Market And CNBC sell microchips to American Public on August 22, 2018.

three-square-market-microchip-employees-rfid-mark-beast-nteb-666-prophecy-933x445

nowtheendbegins.com

by July 23, 2017


Three Square Market (32M) is offering implanted chip technology to all of their employees on August 1st, 2017. Employees will be implanted with a RFID chip allowing them to make purchases in their break room micro market, open doors, login to computers, use the copy machine, etc.  This program, offered by 32M, is optional for all employees. The company is expecting over 50 staff members to be voluntarily chipped.  32M is partnering with BioHax International from Sweden.


WISCONSIN COMPANY THREE SQUARE MARKET IS ABOUT TO BECOME THE FIRST IN THE U.S. TO OFFER MICROCHIP IMPLANTS TO ITS EMPLOYEES. YES, YOU READ THAT RIGHT. MICROCHIP IMPLANTS.

“And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads: And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.” Revelation 13:16,17 (KJV)

EDITOR’S NOTE: Now The End Begins began 8 years ago in December of 2009 primarily as an end times ministry warning the world of God’s impending judgment and the soon fulfillment of Bible prophecy. We have done countless stories chronicling the rise of the human implantable microchip in our society. What began as a mere trickle in Europe is ready to break through here in America as the implantable microchip becomes the “next big thing”. Remember those lines of people waiting for days on end to be the first to get the new iPhone? That’s what you will soon see with the microchip. Flight #777 on Titus 213 Airlines now boarding…

“It’s the next thing that’s inevitably going to happen, and we want to be a part of it,” Three Square MarketChief Executive Officer Todd Westby said.

The company designs software for break room markets that are commonly found in office complexes.

OFFICIAL PRESS RELEASE FROM 32M:

RIVER FALLS, WIS. – JULY 20, 2017 – PRLOG — THREE SQUARE MARKET (32M) IS OFFERING IMPLANTED CHIP TECHNOLOGY TO ALL OF THEIR EMPLOYEES ON AUGUST 1ST, 2017. EMPLOYEES WILL BE IMPLANTED WITH A RFID CHIP ALLOWING THEM TO MAKE PURCHASES IN THEIR BREAK ROOM MICRO MARKET, OPEN DOORS, LOGIN TO COMPUTERS, USE THE COPY MACHINE, ETC. THIS PROGRAM, OFFERED BY 32M, IS OPTIONAL FOR ALL EMPLOYEES. THE COMPANY IS EXPECTING OVER 50 STAFF MEMBERS TO BE VOLUNTARILY CHIPPED. 32M IS PARTNERING WITH BIOHAX INTERNATIONAL AND JOWAN OSTERLAND, CEO, BASED OUT OF SWEDEN. SOURCE

JUST AS PEOPLE ARE ABLE TO PURCHASE ITEMS AT THE MARKET USING PHONES, WESTBY WANTS TO DO THE SAME THING USING A MICROCHIP IMPLANTED INSIDE A PERSON’S HAND.

“We’ll come up, scan the item,” he explained, while showing how the process will work at an actual break room market kiosk. “We’ll hit pay with a credit card, and it’s asking to swipe my proximity payment now. I’ll hold my hand up, just like my cell phone, and it’ll pay for my product.”

MORE THAN 50 THREE SQUARE MARKET EMPLOYEES ARE HAVING THE DEVICES IMPLANTED STARTING NEXT WEEK. EACH CHIP IS ABOUT THE SIZE OF A SINGLE GRAIN OF RICE.

ALONG WITH PURCHASING MARKET KIOSK ITEMS, EMPLOYEES WILL BE ABLE TO USE THE CHIP TO GET INTO THE FRONT DOOR AND LOG ONTO THEIR COMPUTERS.

 

Each chip costs $300 and the company is picking up the tab. They’re implanted between a person’s thumb and forefinger.  Westby added the data is both encrypted and secure.

 

“There’s no GPS tracking at all,” he said.

 

No one who works at Three Square Market is required to get the chip implant. source

United Kingdom Companies Implanting Employees With Microchips.

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Jowan Österlund from Biohax holds a microchip implant the size of a grain of rice between his thumb and forefinger. Photograph: James Brooks/AP

Alarm over talks to implant UK employees with microchips.

theguardian.com

Trades Union Congress concerned over tech being used to control and micromanage.

Britain’s biggest employer organisation and main trade union body have sounded the alarm over the prospect of British companies implanting staff with microchips to improve security.

UK firm BioTeq, which offers the implants to businesses and individuals, has already fitted 150 implants in the UK.

The tiny chips, implanted in the flesh between the thumb and forefinger, are similar to those for pets. They enable people to open their front door, access their office or start their car with a wave of their hand, and can also store medical data.

Another company, Biohax of Sweden, also provides human chip implants the size of a grain of rice. It told the Sunday Telegraph (£) that it is in discussions with several British legal and financial firms about fitting their employees with microchips, including one major company with hundreds of thousands of employees.

The CBI, which represents 190,000 UK businesses, voiced concerns about the prospect.

A CBI spokesperson said: “While technology is changing the way we work, this makes for distinctly uncomfortable reading. Firms should be concentrating on rather more immediate priorities and focusing on engaging their employees.”

The TUC is worried that staff could be coerced into being microchipped. Its general secretary Frances O’Grady said: “We know workers are already concerned that some employers are using tech to control and micromanage, whittling away their staff’s right to privacy.

“Microchipping would give bosses even more power and control over their workers. There are obvious risks involved, and employers must not brush them aside, or pressure staff into being chipped.”

Steven Northam, the founder and owner of Hampshire-based BioTeq, told the Guardian that most of its 150 implants have been for individuals, while some financial and engineering firms have also had the chips implanted in their staff.

BioTeq has also implanted them in employees of a bank testing the technology, and has shipped them to Spain, France, Germany, Japan and China.

They cost between £70 and £260 per person. Northam himself and all the directors at BioTeq and one of his other companies, IncuHive, have been microchipped.

Jowan Österlund, the founder of Biohax and a former body piercer, told the Telegraph that his microchips, which cost £150 each, could help financial and legal firms improve security. “These companies have sensitive documents they are dealing with. [The chips] would allow them to set restrictions for whoever.”

Österlund said big companies, with 200,000 employees, could offer this as an opt-in. “If you have a 15% uptake that is still a huge number of people that won’t require a physical ID pass.”

Last year Wisconsin-based Three Square Market partnered with Biohax and became the first company in the US to microchip its employees, on a voluntary basis.

KPMG, one of the big four accountancy firms, said it was not planning to microchip its employees and “would under no circumstances consider doing so”.

Fellow accounting firms EY and PwC also said they would not consider microchipping their employees. Deloitte declined to comment.

Biohax has plans to open an office in London, according to its website. It claims 4,000 people have been microchipped, mostly in Sweden. It is working with the state-owned Swedish rail firm Statens Järnvägar, to allow its passengers to travel via chip implants rather than train tickets. Biohax did not respond to requests for comment.

Chinese Communist Customer Score Being Used In The United States Secretly.

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toptechnicalsolutions.com

Two people call customer service at the same time to complain about the same thing. One waits a few seconds before a representative gets on the line. The other stays on hold. Why the difference?

There’s a good chance it has something to do with a rating known as a customer lifetime value, or CLV. That secret number is used by all manner of companies to measure the potential financial value of their customers.

Your score can determine the prices you pay, the products and ads you see and the perks you receive.

Credit-card companies use the scoring systems to decide what to offer customers who want to cancel their cards. Wireless carriers route high-value callers immediately to their most skilled agents. At some airlines, a high score increases the odds of a seat upgrade.

In the model, the scores ranged from $8.52 to $203.93.

Company will refrain from marketing to such customers and won’t be in a hurry to answer their messages.

Single man, 22

High-school diploma

Lives in rural area

Shops rarely, mostly on weekdays

Usually buys at deep discounts

Returns merchandise excessively

Company will send an occasional discount.

Single woman, 31

Bachelor’s degree

Lives in suburbs

Shops a fair amount

Browses for discounts but often exceeds budget

Never returns merchandise

Company will invite such customers to VIP events and ensure their complaints get answered first.

Married woman, 41

Graduate degree

Lives in big city

Shops regularly, mostly on weekends

Usually pays full price and rarely returns items

Buys and browses best-quality items

“There’s no free lunch,” says Sunil Gupta, a marketing professor at Harvard Business School who has researched models for calculating lifetime value. “The more profitable you are, the better service you will get.”

These days, companies are resorting to all sorts of data and scores to size up consumers and predict their behavior. Retailers use risk scores to try to limit merchandise returns and prevent e-commerce fraud. There are scores to measure the likelihood a person will become sick, cancel a subscription or bad-mouth a company.

Everyone with a bank account, cellphone or online shopping habit has at least one CLV score, more likely several. And most people have no inkling they even exist, let alone how they are used, what goes into them or how accurate they are. Unlike credit scores, CLVs aren’t available to consumers and aren’t monitored by any government agency.

“There needs to be a public conversation around the accuracy of the scores being used,” says Pam Dixon, executive director of the World Privacy Forum, a nonprofit digital-privacy research group. “You can essentially be accused of being cheap or a fraudster, and it may not even be true.”

To determine how the scores are compiled and how they are used, The Wall Street Journal interviewed data scientists who develop the models and employees of the software and analytics firms that help companies put them to use.

Most CLV score users contacted for this article declined to comment on how they score customers, citing competitive reasons. Many say the scores make them more comfortable offering costly services and products in the short term because they are confident they will pick up more business in the long term. Some say they aim to increase each customer’s lifetime value by encouraging repeat business.

In some respects, the scores are just a high-tech version of what shopkeepers have done for generations—make judgments on a customer’s value based on how they look or behave. As far back as 20 years ago, academics were publishing models to calculate the future value of customers.

Now there are hundreds of analytics firms that calculate customer lifetime value, each with its own approach. Some of them put a value on shoppers based simply on what they spend, while others use hundreds of data inputs, adding and deducting points for demographic information such as ZIP Codes or behavioral details such as the number of returns they make or when they shop.

“Not all customers deserve a company’s best efforts,” says Peter Fader, a marketing professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School who helped popularize lifetime value scores. His scoring method is based on transaction history, which he says is all companies need to determine how customers will behave in the future. This year, he sold the firm he co-founded, Zodiac Inc., which performs such analysis, to

Nike
Inc.

The data that goes into a score can come from transaction records, website interactions, customer-service conversations, social-media profiles and third-party brokers such as Acxiom LLC and

Alliance Data Systems
Corp.’s

Epsilon, which sell information on such things as the number of bedrooms in a house and the type of credit card someone carries. Each piece of data is weighted based on past patterns and perceived level of predictability.

Marital status is often factored in, with some companies assuming that singles are better customers, and others, the opposite. Age also is a common input, potentially penalizing older people because of their shorter projected lifespans.

DARPA Seeks FAA Approval For Military Drones Over American Cities

zerohedge.com
by Tyler Durden
Wed, 10/31/2018 – 23:05

Authored by Nicholas West via ActivistPost.com,

Just a little over 10 years after drone surveillance inside U.S. borders was declared a conspiracy theory, it is now an indisputable fact of life. So, too, are military grade drones along the “border,” which in reality constitutes a 100-mile-wide swath that encircles the continental United States and 2/3 of its population.

According to a new report from Defense One, this level of access is still seen as a restriction by the DARPA-directed military apparatus. As new forms of autonomous aircraft take to the skies such as the latest Blackhawk helicopter drones that could be ready by 2019, DARPA and aircraft developers want permission to fly over large cities as needed. Utilizing a new artificial intelligence system that is literally called MATRIX, developers see an opportunity for more flexibility in potential use. Of course, surveillance isn’t mentioned among those uses:

After that, similar to Predator drone maker General Atomics, they have their eyes on FAA certification to fly large, unmanned aircraft within the continental United States, to help ferry people and supplies from the mainland to offshore oil rigs, among other potential jobs. Today, large drones likes Predators are forbidden to fly over the U.S. except in a handful of largely unpopulated areas along the U.S.Mexico border.

The FAA is now figuring out how to change guidelines to allow unmanned planes and helicopters to fly over big cities. “We are working with the FAA on that. Our stated goal is 2030. It very much depends on rule making. We are certainly hoping for sooner, for the mid-2020s, to field it,” he said.

In that linked article sourced above, the long-range plans of converting military aircraft to dronesand incorporating them anywhere and everywhere inside America is also detailed and expanded upon as a potential replacement for the already controversial use of police drones.

By 2025, enormous military-style drones – close relatives of the sort made famous by counterterrorism strikes in Afghanistan and Iraq – will be visible 2,000 feet above U.S. cities, streaming high-resolution video to police departments below. That is the bet that multiple defense contractors are placing, anyway, as they race to build unmanned aircraft that can pass evolving airworthiness certifications and replace police helicopters. And if that bet pays off, it will radically transform the way cities, citizens, and law enforcement interact.

We are now seeing various trends beginning to dovetail into what could become the ultimate in military presence over the United States. As I recently reported, new A.I. algorithms are being devised that look for emotional indicators in an attempt to predict crime and social unrest. The “Eye in the Sky” system, developed by Cambridge University, seeks to use small Parrot drones to identify “violent poses” in crowds. The system will be powered by biometric recognition and artificial intelligence, as seen in the video below:

Imagine a system like this being applied to the far more sophisticated military systems that already exist, then connecting all of it to the growing federal biometrics database.

I suspect that if the FAA does grant access to larger military aircraft over U.S. cities, it will be with the “strict guidelines” that no forms of surveillance or weaponry will be permitted onboard. Of course, once granted even the slightest access, all it will take is one catastrophic event to remove any restrictions at all.

“Unlike many new industries, which grow unfettered until emerging problems prompt regulation, unmanned flight needs relief from existing restrictions in order to blossom, Scassero said. Once that happens, the market for large unmanned planes could be enormous.”

For reference, here is what I wrote in 2013 regarding the long-term plans and eventuality that was also hinted at in the mainstream media at the time in an Associated Press article entitled, “Drones With Facial Recognition Technology Will End Anonymity, Everywhere.”

AP certainly offers a correct summary of how the databases that already exist (where we thought our personal information was protected) will be opened and utilized any time necessary.

“From seeing just the image of a face, computers will find its match in a database of millions of driver’s license portraits and photos on social media sites. From there, the computer will link to the person’s name and details such as their Social Security number, preferences, hobbies, family and friends.

Adding that capability to drones that can fly into spaces where planes cannot — machines that can track a person moving about and can stay aloft for days — means that people will give up privacy as well as the concept of anonymity.”

Naturally, the AP peddles this softly as it recounts these “new” developments in a tale of researchers with Carnegie Mellon University’s CyLab Biometrics Center attempting to assist in sharpening FBI images of Boston bombing suspects, the Tsarnaev brothers. This is reminiscent of the above-mentioned Chris Dorner manhunt where we heard calls for how nice it would have been to have a drone at the ready for quicker identification and possible assassination.

“In a real-time experiment, the scientists digitally mapped the face of “Suspect 2,” turned it toward the camera and enhanced it so it could be matched against a database. The researchers did not know how well they had done until authorities identified the suspect as Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the younger, surviving brother and a student at University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.

‘I was like, ‘Holy shish kabobs!’ ‘ Marios Savvides, director of the CMU Cylab, told the Tribune-Review. ‘It’s not exactly him, but it’s also not a random face. It does fit him.’”

This astonishment is somewhat absurd considering that drones have already been developed that are equipped with camera systems like DARPA’s Autonomous Real-time Ground Ubiquitous Surveillance Imaging System (ARGUS). This sensor system can instantly see an area roughly the “size of a small city” with an “all-seeing” eye according to retired Lieutenant, David A. Deptula. The next generation of surveillance tech sees the landscape through a 1.8 billion pixels camera, the highest resolution yet created.

Using a touchscreen interface that can produce up to 65 windows for analysis, military observers can see down to the individual object level to track the movements of vehicles and people. Beyond the real-time surveillance, the system can store everything for future review right down to the minutes and seconds.

The only thing truly new about this Associated Press story is the announcement that what most people thought to be limited to overseas theaters of war will now definitely be used across Battlefield USA.

European Union To Start Using Artificial Intelligence Robot At Borders.

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An AI Lie Detector Is Going to Start Questioning Travelers in the EU

gizmodo.com

A number of border control checkpoints in the European Union are about to get increasingly—and unsettlingly—futuristic.

In Hungary, Latvia, and Greece, travelers will be given an automated lie-detection test—by an animated AI border agent. The system, called iBorderCtrl, is part of a six-month pilot led by the Hungarian National Police at four different border crossing points.

“We’re employing existing and proven technologies—as well as novel ones—to empower border agents to increase the accuracy and efficiency of border checks,” project coordinator George Boultadakis of European Dynamics in Luxembourg told the European Commission. “iBorderCtrl’s system will collect data that will move beyond biometrics and on to biomarkers of deceit.”

The virtual border control agent will ask travelers questions after they’ve passed through the checkpoint. Questions include, “What’s in your suitcase?” and “If you open the suitcase and show me what is inside, will it confirm that your answers were true?” according to New Scientist. The system reportedly records travelers’ faces using AI to analyze 38 micro-gestures, scoring each response. The virtual agent is reportedly customized according to the traveler’s gender, ethnicity, and language.

For travelers who pass the test, they will receive a QR code that lets them through the border. If they don’t, the virtual agent will reportedly get more serious, and the traveler will be handed off to a human agent who will asses their report. But, according to the New Scientist, this pilot program won’t, in its current state, prevent anyone’s ability to cross the border.

This is because the program is very much in the experimental phases. In fact, the automated lie-detection system was modeled after another system created by some individuals from iBorderCtrl’s team, but it was only tested on 30 people. In this test, half of the people told the truth while the other half lied to the virtual agent. It had about a 76 percent accuracy rate, and that doesn’t take into consideration the variances in being told to lie versus earnestly lying. “If you ask people to lie, they will do it differently and show very different behavioral cues than if they truly lie, knowing that they may go to jail or face serious consequences if caught,” Maja Pantic, a Professor of Affective and Behavioral Computing at Imperial College London, told New Scientist. “This is a known problem in psychology.”

Keeley Crockett at Manchester Metropolitan University, UK, and a member of the iBorderCtrl team, said that they are “quite confident” they can bring the accuracy rate up to 85 percent. But more than 700 million people travel through the EU every year, according to the European Commission, so that percentage would still lead to a troubling number of misidentified “liars” if the system were rolled out EU-wide.

It’s slightly reassuring that the program—which cost the EU a little more than $5 million—is only being implemented in select countries in a limited trial period. It is crucial for such a system to collect as much training data as possible, from as diverse a pool of travelers as possible. But systems dependent on machine learning, especially ones involving facial recognition technology, are to date still very flawed and deeply biased. At a time when crossing borders is already contentious and unfairly biased, throwing a partial, imperfect “agent” into the mix raises some justified concerns.

[New Scientist]

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