Radical Left Raphael Warnock A Wolf In Sheep’s Clothing Uses Christianity To Promote Socialism In His Sermon’s At Ebenezer Baptist Church.

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Raphael Warnock Mentored by Radical Theologian James Cone, Who Railed Against ‘Satanic Whiteness’

Source: Breitbart.com

By Sean Moran

Georgia Senate candidate Rev. Raphael Warnock’s mentor, Dr. James Cone, who fought against “satanic whiteness” and called for the “destruction of everything white” in society.

RADICAL LEFT RAPHAEL WARNOCK A WOLF IN SHEEP’S CLOTHING USES CHRISTIANITY TO PROMOTE SOCIALISM IN HIS SERMONS AT EBENEZER BAPTIST CHURCH.

Radical Left Raphael Warnock A Wolf In Sheep’s Clothing Uses Christianity To Promote Socialism In His Sermon’s At Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Warnock, the Democrat heading to a runoff against incumbent Sen. Kelly Loeffler (R-GA), has praised Cone, a controversial black theologian, as a “poignant and powerful voice” of high “spiritual magnitude.”

Cone served as Warnock’s academic adviser at the Union Theological Seminary; Warnock described Cone as his “mentor.”

Cone is considered the “father of black theology,” as outlined in his 1970 book A Black Theology of Liberation.

Cone contends in the book that “American white theology is a theology of the Antichrist” and calls for a new, Marx-inspired “black theology” that will bring in a revolution to eliminate whiteness from society. For Cone, “black” and “white” are indeed ethnic descriptors but also labels of power; he identifies whites with the “oppressor” majority culture and blacks with the “oppressed” minority culture.

In orthodox Christianity, the divine savior Jesus Christ was crucified not just as an execution by the Roman empire but as an atoning sacrifice to reconcile sinful humans to God their creator. In Cone’s theology, the cross is not about atonement but about “solidarity” with the oppressed. God himself is black, he argues:

Because blacks have come to know themselves as black, and because that blackness is the cause of their own love of themselves and hatred of whiteness, the blackness of God is key to knowledge of God. The blackness of God, and everything implied by it in a racist society, is the heart of the black theology doctrine of God. There is no place in black theology for a colorless God in a society where human beings suffer precisely because of their color. The black theologian must reject any conception of God which stifles black self-determination by picturing God as a God of all peoples. Either God is identified with the oppressed to the point that their experience becomes God’s experience, or God is a God of racism.

Thus, Cone argues in Black Theology, salvation comes from being like God and becoming “black” — that is, adopting total political solidarity with the black community. He declares that “satanic whiteness” makes “white religionists” incapable of “perceiving the blackness of God;” therefore, they must purge themselves of said whiteness: “There will be no peace in America until white people begin to hate their whiteness, asking from the depths of their being: ‘How can we become black?’”

Warnock’s mentor charged that this black theology would pursue the “destruction of everything white,” explaining:

The goal of black theology is the destruction of everything white, so that blacks can be liberated from alien gods… If whites were really serious about their radicalism in regard to the black revolution and its theological implications in America, they would keep silent and take instructions from blacks. Only blacks can speak about God in relationship to their liberation. And those who wish to join us in this divine work must be willing to lose their white identity — indeed, destroy it.

To drive the point home, this directive to destroy all that is white extends to God himself. “If God is not for us, if God is not against white racists, then God is a murderer, and we had better kill God,” he writes.

And in his political praxis, Cone does not rule out physical violence:

We have reached our limit of tolerance, and if it means death with dignity, or life with humiliation, we choose the former. And if that is the choice, we will take out some honkies with us… The black experience is the feeling one has when attacking the enemy of black humanity by throwing a Molotov cocktail into a white-owned building and watching it go up in flames. We know, of course, that getting rid of evil takes something more than burning down buildings, but one must start somewhere.

Decades after Black Theology‘s publication, Cone wrote in a preface for a new printing that he no longer views the Bible or Jesus Christ as exclusive revelations of spiritual truth. “I am black first — and everything else comes after that,” he said. “This means I read the Bible through the lens of a black tradition of struggle and not as the objective word of God.”

The Bible therefore is one witness to God’s empowering presence in human affairs, along with other important testimonies. The other testimonies include sacred documents of the African-American experience — such as the speeches of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr., the writings of Zora Neale Hurston and Toni Morrison, the music of the blues, jazz, and rap. Liberating stories, myths, and legends are also found among men and women of all races and cultures struggling to realize the divine intention for their lives. I believe that the Bible is a liberating word for many people but not the only word of liberation.

Warnock touted Cone in his own 2013 book, 2013’s The Divided Mind of the Black Church, as well as in a 2018 eulogy.

“How blessed we are that someone of the spiritual magnitude and power and commitment of Dr. James Hal Cone passed our way,” Warnock said at Cone’s funeral.

After the 2016 presidential election, Warnock condemned white Christians and called President Donald Trump a “fascist, racist, sexist xenophobe.” Warnock has also repeatedly praised the controversial Rev. Jeremiah Wright and defended Wright’s “God Damn America” sermon. The Georgia Democrat has also praised Marxism as a way to “teach the black church.”

Wright also thanked Cone’s work for inspiring his own religious writings.

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Raphael Warnock Was Assistant Pastor at Church That Hosted Fidel Castro in 1991

 
Raphael Warnock, the Democrat challenging Sen. Kelly Loeffler (R-Ga.) in the U.S. Senate special election that is going to a runoff, served as an assistant pastor at a church that hosted and celebrated the late Cuban dictator Fidel Castro in 1995, Fox News’ Sam Dorman reported. Warnock’s campaign insisted the candidate was not a decision-maker at the church when Castro spoke there.

C-SPAN footage of Castro’s speech at the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem shows an exuberant crowd chanting “Fidel! Fidel! Fidel!” as Calvin Butts — still the church’s senior pastor — praises the dictator. Sister Rosemari Mealy, who belonged to the National Alliance of Third World Journalists, also prompted applause at the event when she introduced the “great, most honorable commandante, el jefe Fidel Castro.”

Castro spoke at the church after the U.S. allowed the Cuban dictator to speak at the United Nations in New York City, where he condemned the U.S.’s embargo on Cuba. Castro could legally remain in the U.S. so long as he stayed within a 25-mile radius of the U.N.

Dorman connected Warnock to the event by linking Warnock’s church bio with news reports from 1995. Warnock currently serves as senior pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, a church he has led since 2005. According to a bio on Ebenezer Baptist Church’s website, Warnock served for 10 years at Abyssinia. A New York Times article in 1997 mentioned him in connection with Abyssinia.

At the time, The Miami Herald reported that Castro “blast[ed] the United States with the vigor that was missing from his speech to the United Nations earlier in the day and winding up the evening with a rousing rendition of the socialist hymn Internationale.”

Warnock’s campaign did not deny the connection. Rather, a spokesman insisted that the reverend did not have decision rights at the church.

“Twenty-five years ago, Reverend Warnock was a youth pastor and was not involved in any decisions at that time,” Terrence Clark, a spokesperson for the campaign, told Fox News. The campaign did not comment on whether or not Warnock attended the event in question.

Loeffler’s campaign tied Warnock’s connection to the Castro speech with the Democrat’s left-wing activism. “Raphael Warnock celebrating Fidel Castro and welcoming him to his church is just the latest example in a long line of his radical, far-left, socialist positions,” Stephen Lawson, a spokesman for Loeffler’s campaign, told Fox News.

“Georgians need someone like Kelly Loeffler who has a record of results creating jobs and opportunities for hardworking families – not a radical socialist who cozies up to brutal dictators,” Lawson concluded.

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), who describes himself as a Democratic socialist, endorsed Warnock, but the reverend has stopped short of endorsing Sanders-style policies. Warnock does not support “Medicare-for-All,” instead backing an expansion of Obamacare in a position closer to that of Joe Biden. Warnock also stops short of endorsing the Green New Deal, but he has called for rejoining the Paris Climate Accords and for transitioning “to a clean economy by 2050.”

Warnock, like Biden, dresses up his support for radical change in a “moderate” garb.

While the results of the 2020 elections remain inconclusive, Republicans picked up seats in the U.S. House of Representatives and seem to be on track to preserve their majority in the U.S. Senate. Moderate Democrats have warned that the party’s leftward lurch toward socialism in the form of Medicare for All and the Green New Deal is marginalizing the party, costing Democrats seats they should be able to win. Radical leaders like Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) have argued that the more open socialist candidates won their races in safe seats.

Georgians will vote in two runoff elections on January 5, in races that will almost certainly determine which party controls the majority of the U.S. Senate for the next two years. Democrats have alienated voters with radical policies like the Green New Deal and Medicare for All, but they have also taken extreme stances in support of packing the U.S. Supreme Court and potentially adding states to the U.S., fundamentally shifting elections in the Democratic direction.

Warnock and Jon Ossoff, the Democratic candidate who is facing Sen. David Perdue (R-Ga.), will have to navigate their party’s extreme policies in a traditionally red state.

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