Monthly Archives: January 2008

Gun Buy Backs A Nationwide Plan To Disarm America – As Economy Slows

Posted by William Kapeles on November 12, 2007

The AP reported today that the city of Cleveland, OH, had a “gun buy-back” event on Saturday, November 10, 2007. The first 450 people who turned in a serviceable handgun received a $100 Shell gas card or a $100 Dave’s Foods supermarket gift card. Below is the AP article in its entirety.:

“Cleveland, OH – More than seventy cars lined up outside the Cleveland Convention Center Saturday morning to swap out their guns for gift cards.The Cleveland Gun Buy Back Program was just another effort to try and take back our streets from Cleveland’s monstrous violence.

Cleveland’s Chief of Police, Chief Michael McGrath, announced that Saturday’s gun buy-back effort took 421 guns off the streets of the City of Cleveland.

“The goal of today’s gun buy-back was two-fold,” said Chief McGrath, “to reduce the number of guns on our streets and to increase the safety of our neighborhoods.”

Thanks to the generous donations by our community partners at ArcelorMittal, the Slavic Village Development Corporation and Dave’s Supermarkets, and the commitment to the safety of our community on the part of Partnership For A Safer Cleveland, we have accomplished just that.”

Each weapon taken in Saturday’s buy-back will be traced and entered into a nationwide database. Ultimately the weapons will be melted down with the assistance of Arcelor Mittal here in Cleveland.

Last year, Cleveland had 119 murders. So far this year – there are already 119 on the books.

The City of Cleveland is trying desperately to stop the violence, and 19 Action News was ready to do what they do best – take action!

The first 450 citizens who turn in a gun received a $100 Shell gas card or Dave’s Food Card. Providing the financial support for this event was Arcelor Mittal and The Slavic Village Development Corporation.

In addition, The Partnership for a Safer Cleveland and the NAACP also provided community support for the event. ” (courtesy of the AP)

This is such a crock of crap. The 421 firearms they confiscated were freely given by people who would never use them in crimes to begin with! By taking these guns “off the streets” they have effectively made Cleveland a more dangerous place. The chances of these misguided fools being killed by an attacker is now much greater because they have given up their firearms.

The other aspect of this liberal publicity stunt that should frighten every American is the emphatic support this action has received from the police. The police in our society have 3 basic functions. First, to protect life. Second, to defend property. Third, to enforce minor laws and regulations. Nowhere in any police charter or set of state statutes does it dictate their duty to be “disarmament of the citizenry.” God help us when the price for firearms lures even the criminals into turning them in!

It is my fervent hope that anyone who reads this will understand the futility of gun control. The people who should not have guns will never turn them in at a media circus like this. They will keep them and continue to perpetrate crimes with them. Honest, although naive or stupid, citizens will give up their guns to the police because they have been tricked into thinking that all good people should do what the police want and that the police can protect them. My question is who will protect us from the police?

Never, never give up your guns. They are all you have. Remember: armed people fly their colors, disarmed people wear them.

Summit County helps fund upcoming gun-buyback program

By Rick Armon

Beacon Journal staff writer

Summit County Council plans to contribute $5,000 toward an upcoming gun-buyback program.

The Goods for Guns program is set for 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Dec. 7 and Dec. 8 at both Akron locations of Jerusalem Baptist: 270 E. Wilbeth Road and 1225 Vernon Odom Blvd.

It is sponsored by Akron police and the Summit County sheriff’s and prosecutor’s offices.

County Councilman John Schmidt announced this week he will introduce legislation Monday to spend the money.

Last year, there were 675 firearms used in crimes and 1,294 emergency calls for shots fired, according to city police. The last gun-buyback program was in 1994 and took in more than 500 guns.

Christine Croce, counsel for the sheriff’s office, said organizers hope to get 300 to 500 guns at the upcoming event.

County residents can turn in guns, legal or illegal, for vouchers that can be exchanged for a wide assortment of goods from tennis shoes to gift cards for groceries. The vouchers will be valued at a minimum of $100.

The sheriff’s office has raised about $36,000 toward the program and still is accepting contributions.

”I hope we get a phenomenal amount of people to turn in their guns,” Summit County Council President Nick Kostandaras said.

For more details, call the sheriff’s office at 330-643-2112.

Beacon Journal staff writer

Summit County Council plans to contribute $5,000 toward an upcoming gun-buyback program.

The Goods for Guns program is set for 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Dec. 7 and Dec. 8 at both Akron locations of Jerusalem Baptist: 270 E. Wilbeth Road and 1225 Vernon Odom Blvd.

It is sponsored by Akron police and the Summit County sheriff’s and prosecutor’s offices.

County Councilman John Schmidt announced this week he will introduce legislation Monday to spend the money.

Last year, there were 675 firearms used in crimes and 1,294 emergency calls for shots fired, according to city police. The last gun-buyback program was in 1994 and took in more than 500 guns.

Christine Croce, counsel for the sheriff’s office, said organizers hope to get 300 to 500 guns at the upcoming event.

County residents can turn in guns, legal or illegal, for vouchers that can be exchanged for a wide assortment of goods from tennis shoes to gift cards for groceries. The vouchers will be valued at a minimum of $100.

The sheriff’s office has raised about $36,000 toward the program and still is accepting contributions.

”I hope we get a phenomenal amount of people to turn in their guns,” Summit County Council President Nick Kostandaras said.

For more details, call the sheriff’s office at 330-643-2112.

Masonic Square And Compass On New Claredon Elementary School – Canton Ohio

By Michael Difensore

I was told by someone I know about a Masonic square and compass on a local elementary school here in Canton. The school is Claredon Elementary located at 412 Clarendon Ave, N.W. Canton, OH 44708. I went to the location to see if it was true and it was. On the very front of the building in carved out scroll work their is a large square and compass. Most people know that a square and compass is a masonic symbol so why is it on the public elementary school?

This story gets even more weird when I found out the scroll work was moved from the old Clarendon School building to the new building that was just finished not long ago. Another thing that is strange about this school is they are called the Claredon Cobras. In my opinion it looks like someone made sure the school kept the symbol but why? I thought that America’s public schools are governed by the principle of separation of church and state? If the Mason symbol was replaced by a Christian cross their would be a uproar. No one says anything though about the Mason symbols on public buildings. Some people think that Freemasons are just a fraternal brotherhood. But the fact is they are a religion who believes in a deity or a God. Here is the Merriam Webster Dictionary defining the word religion – (1): the service and worship of God or the supernatural (2): commitment or devotion to religious faith or observance2: a personal set or institutionalized system of religious attitudes, beliefs, and practices3archaic : scrupulous conformity : conscientiousness4: a cause, principle, or system of beliefs held to with ardor and faith. The Freemasons are clearly a religion. Once a Mason gets promoted past the 32 degree he will find out the Freemasons worship Lucifer. So its ok for a Satanic religion to have their symbols on public buildings threw out America but not Christians. A evil secret society rules over America in plain sight.


Five On Your Side Investigative Journalist Duane Pohlman Showing Traffic Camera’s Illegal

newsnet5.com – Click Here To Watch Video And All Links Below
Video: Pohlman Confronts Mayor | Video: Motorists’ Challenge | Images: Red-Light Camera Mistakes | Part 1

Red-light cameras installed at Cleveland intersections have become controversial. 5 On Your Side chief investigator Duane Pohlman said flashes are oftentimes the only clue the cameras caught cars speeding or running red lights. Confirmation arrives later as a ticket in the mail, with a $100 fine. The cameras are triggering key questions before Ohio’s highest court. “We are starting to lose our freedom,” one motorist said. At the very least, motorists said these devices are just plain unfair. “I think we should get rid of them,” another motorist said. For the past six months, 5 On Your Side has been investigating the red-light cameras and found, from the sophisticated electronics to the system that supports it, the cameras not only can make mistakes — they do, Pohlman said. NewsChannel5 spoke with Dave Hatala, a 5 On Your Side videographer. “Something’s wrong with the whole system,” Hatala said. He got a ticket in the mail saying he was speeding on Chester Avenue at East 71st Street. He was cited for going 48 mph in a 35 mph zone. The only problem is that Hatala insisted he never went that fast “This was wrong, and I’m willing to fight that,” he said. Along with his ticket, Hatala got pictures showing his van and another car that appeared to be going faster. “I immediately could see they ticketed the wrong lane,” Hatala said. “A car going faster than me that you can clearly see is overtaking me.” Could the ticket be a mistake? To get answers, Pohlman went to Chris Butler, a math professor at Case Western University. “If you know the distance and you know the time you can calculate the speed,” Butler said. Hatala brought the measuring device. Butler measured the location using markers from the pictures. He determined Hatala’s real rate of speed. “Dave Hatala was traveling 40.5 mph,” Butler said.He also found the real speed for that other car, too — 48 mph. Hatala brought the findings to court to challenge his ticket. “Becomes pretty clear that it wasn’t your vehicle that was speeding,” the judge said. He didn’t have to argue much. Pohlman said the court admitted the ticket was issued to the wrong car, in the wrong lane. “So based upon the testimony provided we are going to find you not liable for this violation,” the judge said. Pohlman reported a different problem at that same location on Chester Avenue at East 71st Street. Bill and Sue Faber of Massillon said they haven’t been in Cleveland for six months, but the city sent them a ticket. “No way we could be in Cleveland,” Faber said. “Do you have witnesses for that?” Pohlman asked. “Yes, we do,” Faber said. Yet Cleveland sent the ticket showing a car speeding, but the plate belongs to the Faber’s truck. Pohlman said you can’t read the license in the picture at all. He said it appears Cleveland guessed and sent the ticket anyway. “I always thought we were always innocent until proven guilty and now I find it’s guilty until I can prove I’m innocent,” Faber said. After NewsChannel5 got involved, the city backed off, writing a letter informing the Fabers that the city made a mistake.”I thought it was ridiculous,” Faber said. NewsChannel5 has received hundreds of e-mails about the red-light cameras and Pohlman continues his investigation at 11 p.m.

5,200 Motorists Fight Tickets From Red-Light Cameras

More than 5,000 people have contested tickets they got from Cleveland’s red-light cameras. Chief Investigator Duane Pohlman took his questions and concerns about the cameras accuracy to Cleveland’s mayor. Jackson gives a green light to the red-light cameras. Pohlman: “Do you support the red light program?”
Mayor Frank Jackson:
“Yes.”
Pohlman:
“Why?”
Jackson:
“Because it is the law.” Pohlman found many people who don’t agree with the mayor. “I think we should get rid of them,” one motorist said. Tickets from the red-light cameras $100 a piece. Last year, the city of Cleveland issued nearly 60,000 tickets raising $5.8 million in revenue. Jackson said the program is all about safety.
Pohlman:
“How can you support a program and say it’s about safety?”
Jackson:
“Again, I am saying it is about safety and as a result of the program it produces revenue at the same time.” Jim Coleman and his wife, Brianne, owed the city of Cleveland $1,000 for 10 tickets issued in less than a month.

Briannne admits she did speed, and this camera captured her again and again and again on Prospect Avenue.
Brianne: “I didn’t know it was 25 mph until I got a ticket.”
Pohlman:
“When did you figure it out?”
Brianne:
“Four weeks after I got the first letter.” She said she never got a warning, only ticket after ticket after ticket. “One ticket it would have been over. If a cop would have stopped me,” Brianne said. “I would like to take my baseball bat to it. 5 On Your Side already proved the cameras aren’t perfect, Pohlman said.

Wrong Vehicle

Bill and Sue Faber, of Massillon, said they haven’t been in Cleveland for six months, but the city sent them a ticket. “No way we could be in Cleveland,” Faber said. “Do you have witnesses for that?” Pohlman asked. “Yes, we do,” Faber said. Yet Cleveland sent the ticket showing a car speeding, but the plate belongs to the Faber’s truck. Pohlman said you can’t read the license in the picture at all. He said it appears Cleveland guessed and sent the ticket anyway. “I always thought we were always innocent until proven guilty and now I find it’s guilty until I can prove I’m innocent,” Faber said. After NewsChannel5 got involved, the city backed off, writing a letter informing the Fabers that the city made a mistake.

Other Car Speeding

And Pohlman proved it with Mr. Math, Case Western University math professor Chris Butler. “If you know the distance and you know the time you can calculate the speed,” Butler said. The city claimed 5 On Your Side videographer Dave Hatala was speeding and gave him a ticket. However, Butler proved the city made a mistake — it was really another car that was speeding. “Given what we measured, it looks more reasonable that the dark car was going 48 mph, not the white van,” Butler said. Hatala won his case in court. “Becomes pretty clear that it wasn’t your vehicle that was speeding,” the judge said.

Court Records

5 On Your Side asked for public records dealing with red-light cameras. After battling for six months, the city delivered very few documents, Pohlman said. What the lawyers were able to get were red-light records of all court hearings. Pohlman said they showed some surprising numbers. In 2006, there were 5,200 court hearings where people, like Hatala, contested tickets from the red-light cameras. Records showed that in one out of every four of cases there were enough problems with the cameras to toss out the ticket or reduce the fine.
Pohlman:
“How can you in good conscience allow a ticket of $100 to just go out when you know you have problems with the red lights?”
Jackson:
“How can I in good conscience allow a person to violate the law?” Jackson is digging his heals in about the cameras, Pohlman said.
Pohlman:
“But the cameras don’t always show a violation of the law.”
Jackson:
“Then they don’t have to pay.”
Pohlman:
“But they have to come down to court.”
Jackson: “They don’t have to pay. It’s a process.” Jackson, like other city leaders, continues giving the green light to the red-light cameras.
Jackson:
“Why don’t you just ask the real question you really want to and ask if we will get rid of the red-light cameras and the speed cameras?”
Pohlman: “Well, let’s ask it. Would you?”
Jackson:
“No. I won’t.”

5 On Your Side Unable To Get Red-Light Ticket Records

People are seeing red when it comes to Cleveland’s traffic cameras.
Sue Faber:
“I always thought we were always innocent until proven guilty.”
Chief Investigator Duane Pohlman: The Fabers in Massillon got a ticket even though they weren’t even in Cleveland.
Faber:
“Now, I find it’s guilty until I can prove I’m innocent.”

Pohlman: On the photo, you can’t even see the plate clearly, but that didn’t stop the city from sending a ticket to the Fabers truck.Clearly it is a car in the photo and the Fabers have a pickup.
Pohlman:
Chris Butler of Case Western Reserve University said that if you know the distance and you know the time, you can calculate the speed.The professor proved our own 5 On Your Side videographer Dave Hatala was not speeding.
Butler: “Given what we measured, it looks more reasonable that the dark car was going 48 miles per hour not the white van.”Normally, this would be the part where I would tell you how many cases have been bungled, and I would point you to documents that prove that.
Pohlman:
5 On Your Side requested the records six months ago, during the hot days of August, and we still don’t have them.We sent a flurry of public records requests to City Hall in August, asking for access to every ticket issued in 2006 at red-light cameras.5 On Your side made endless calls and sent dozens of e-mails.
Pohlman:
This is the longest I’ve waited for public records — ever.Well, what’s expected usually, the law says that within five business days you have to provide either the documents or some kid of responseIn December, E.W. Scripps attorney Dave Giles, agreed to get some of the records — even though the city insisted we pay more than $900.In an e-mail that quickly followed, Giles asked that information to be placed on disc to avoid such a huge charge.We still don’t have the records.It has dragged out for a significant amount of time for fairly basic information.Now, Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson, who defends the red-light camera program, blames our attorney for the delays.
Jackson: “Your attorney agreed that records that was available were acceptable to him.”
Pohlman:
But even if we paid, which we won’t, our money wouldn’t go to the city of Cleveland. It would go to a private company ACS logo from Google images. That’s right ACS, a private company based in Dallas, Texas, manages the red-light cameras of Cleveland and makes big money doing it — $3.6 million a year.And ACS keeps the red light records and the mayor defends the system.
Pohlman:
“Why are we allowing a business to do this?”
Jackson:
“Governments have vendors all over the place that have records about how they do business and when people ask for those records the government usually goes to the vendors and it’s not unusual.”
Pohlman: So far, we’ve only gotten these court records — delivered last month — showing all the hearings where people contested their tickets from red-light cameras.It shows a surprising number. More than one out of four people who took their case to municipal court last year won.
Hatala:
“Becomes pretty clear that it wasn’t your vehicle that was speeding.”
Pohlman:
Hatala won his case after he proved the city got the wrong car in the wrong lane.We’ve gotten hundreds of calls and emails from you telling us the city needs to stop the red light cameras.
Hatala:
“I think we should get rid of them.”So far, the mayor has a three-word answer.
Jackson:
“No. I won’t. “


Hudson School District Fingerprint Scanning Students To Buy Lunch In Akron Ohio

By Kimberley Sirk
Special to the Beacon Journal

HUDSON: District students will see changes to their school lunchrooms in the new year.

But these changes will have nothing to do with the menu.

Within the next few months, purchases can be made with just a fingerprint

District Business Manager Paul Smith said new equipment was installed in the elementary buildings just before the holiday break. The middle and high schools will be brought online within the first two weeks after students return from the holiday break.

The system is provided by Food Service Solutions of Altoona, Pa.

The company says the system provides better reporting tools for districts and parents, and it can be run over a school’s existing computer network.

The system cost the Hudson district about $25,700.

The system will allow parents to monitor what their children are purchasing at lunch and add money to their family accounts.

Other Akron-area districts using this type of software include: Green, Nordonia Hills and St. Vincent-St. Mary High School.

”We’ll be totally cashless after Feb. 1,” Smith said.

Vending machines will not be affected by the upgrades.

Those parents who want to use cash or a check to add to a lunch account will still be able to do so.